Nausea and vomiting

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This page is for adult patients. For pediatric patients, see: nausea and vomiting (peds). For nausea and vomiting during pregnancy, see hyperemesis gravidarum.

Background

Nausea and Vomiting Algorithm

Clinical Features

  • Nausea and/or vomiting
  • Additional features of underlying process

Differential Diagnosis

Nausea and vomiting

Critical

Emergent

Nonemergent

By organ system

GI

Neurologic

Infectious

Drugs/Toxins

Endocrine

Miscellaneous

Evaluation

Varies widely depending on clinical presentation

Management

Disposition

  • Depends on cause
  • Most non-specific episodes of acute nausea and vomiting may be discharged, if:
    • No emergent/urgent cause identified or suspected
    • Patient tolerating fluids after treatment

Complications

See Also

External Links

References

  1. Lindblad AJ, Ting R, Harris K. Inhaled isopropyl alcohol for nausea and vomiting in the emergency department. Can Fam Physician. 2018;64(8):580.